Local Caught for Multiple Accounts of Theft –

Local Caught for Multiple Accounts of Theft –

Caught for a stolen vehicle but found guilty of much more

Caught for a stolen vehicle but found guilty of much more

By Xan Johnson, Marketing

On Monday September 14, 20-year-old Richard John Brown was arrested in Provo, Utah, for multiple charges of theft. Originally arrested for being in possession of a stolen vehicle, it was later found out that he had stolen much more. One such item was an iPhone, used by officials to contact the victims of said burglary. Their story matched up almost perfectly with the apparent evidence found on Brown. Other items stolen include an iPod, a GoPro, a camcorder and around $900 in cash.

Regarding all these charges, Brown gave a series of poor excuses saying, for example, that he simply found all of these items at a local gas station. As to the cash, he was apparently just saving money for a storage unit. Overall, officials noted that Brown’s statements were not descriptive or consistent. In addition to the items previously mentioned, a pistol was also found in his possession, which another individual later came to claim as his stolen item. Brown has since been released with conditions; however several other reports of theft remain unsolved, with Brown as a prime suspect.

Thankfully, in this case the suspect was caught with fairly overwhelming evidence. His lies, nonetheless, did not make the job any easier on local police. A way to filter out future deception from both Brown and other criminals could save governments or other organizations thousands of dollars. A test such as the polygraph would be appropriate for large scale criminal activity; but it seems unfit for small charges of burglary such as this. Studies over the past few years have led to the development of a more efficient way to measure deception – EyeDetect®.

EyeDetect skips the invasive process of simultaneously measuring several physiological indicators at once, instead focusing one powerful, previously unnoticed indicator- the eyes. Involuntary extra strain that comes from lying forces our pupils to dilate, exposing our deception. EyeDetect uses advanced infrared cameras to track these incredibly small dilations. Then a computer algorithm reports the subject’s potential deception percentage. EyeDetect is customizable, fast, and simple. A test could be tailor-made to ask a subject specifically about stolen items, giving 85% accuracy in just 30 minutes. Future suspects of even small cases of theft could be quickly questioned using EyeDetect to determine if further investigation is even necessary.

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Photo by / Markus Winkler